WEEK 36 2021


Milk was being sold at retail in the Minden market last week for 7 cents a quart, a break of 3 cents on the price.

Bushnell Record (Bushnell, NE) 10 Mar 1921


John Turnbull had the misfortune to lose the flesh from three fingers of his right hand one day last week. He caught his hand in a corn shredder.

The Elmwood Leader-Echo (Elmwood, NE) 29 Nov 1901


1921

Stella, sixteen-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jake Zimmerman, Eleventh and Avenue B, narrowly escaped death or serious injury yesterday evening when she was struck down and run over by a large car being driven by “Slim” Nason, and employee of the Eat café.

The car, driven by Nason, was coming north on Central Ave., at a fair rate of speed, according to bystanders, and as it reached the middle of the block the girl attempted to cross the street. The car struck her down and both the front and rear wheels on the left side of the auto passed over her unconscious form. The accident occurred in front of the Smith Bros. market, and hundreds of bystanders and Saturday evening shoppers who lined both sides of Central Ave. at that hour witnessed the accident.

Officer Joe Morris was within a few feet of the accident and ran to the girls assistance. He carried her from the street and ordered her taken to St. Luke’s hospital, where she was attended by Dr. C. K. Gibbons.

Upon examination it was found that she received no broken bones from the accident and her injuries for the most part consisted of bruises about the limbs and body.

Officer Morris, when discussing the accident, stated that he was unable to judge the speed that Nason was driving, although he skidded his wheels in an effort to stop. It was thought by the officer that the girl was crossing from the parking to the street and failed to note the approaching car.

The car driven by Nason was a big Buick and those who witnessed the accident did not make the complaint that the machine was exceeding the speed limit.

Chief Laughlin was uncertain whether or not an investigation would be made. Nason made no attempt to get away and was visibly worried over the result of the unfortunate collision.

The Kearney Morning Times (Kearney, NE) 10 Jun 1917


An infuriated cow drew the 12-year-old son of Samuel Bowerstock of Thayer beneath a wagon and strangled the life out of him. The boy had gone to get the cow from the pasture, and as the beast was rather wild, he tied the halter around his waist in order to better hold her. The cow became frightened and started to run, dragging the boy off his feet and over the rough ground. The lad was helpless, and although his screams brought assistance it came too late to save his life. In going around the wagon, the cow pulled him in between the wheels and literally crushed him to death.

The Western Nebraska Observer (Kimball, NE) 6 May 1897


William Greaser, a valley ranchman near Laramie, shot and killed his wife, Mrs. Katie Greaser, and then turned the revolver on himself, sending a bullet crashing into his own brain.

Fort Laramie Signal and Jayem News (Fort Laramie, WY) 10 Jul 1918


Cheyenne.—Irving McNett, who was arrested by local police at the insistence of his father-in-law, tried to commit suicide by hanging himself. He had made a rope out of his clothing, one end of which he had tied to the steam pipe in the ceiling while standing on a bench. After everything was ready he pushed the bench over and was left dangling in the air for a moment until the rope broke. He was in the act of tying the rope together again for another attempt when he was seen by Chief of Police McClement, who was passing through the corridor. McNett is being held until officers get here from Kansas in which state, it is said, he is wanted for forgery.

Goshen County Journal (Torrington, WY) 8 Apr 1915

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