WEEK 51 2021


Explosion Kills Nebraskans

Wheatland, Wyo. Jan. 2.—Two workmen were killed and the two Fend brothers, contractors from Morrill, Neb., were fatally injured by the premature explosion of forty kegs of powder used in excavation work on the Sibbyle ditch, twenty-five miles from here.

The Alliance Herald (Alliance, NE) Thursday, January 5th, 1911


COUNTY CLERK BURNED BY GAS

Doctor Gives Hope For Mrs. Heynen, But No Assurance For A Week

Mrs. Daisy T. Heinen, county clerk of Kimball county, is lingering between life and death in the private hospital of Dr. Johnson in Cheyenne as a result of a gasoline explosion at her home in this city last Sunday morning. Mrs. Heynen arose last Sunday morning and attempted to light a gasoline stove to heat some water for a bath. The gas had not been turned off the night before and when she lighted a match an explosion followed which enveloped her in flames and set fire to her clothing. She rolled up in rugs and what loose clothing she could gather in her frantic efforts to smother the flames. Her screaming attracted the attention of the neighbors, who rushed to the home shortly after she had smothered the fire and put in a telephone call to the F. R. Morgan home nearby. Mrs. Heynen was alone at the time, her little daughter being at the home of an uncle near Shelton on a vacation.

Sunday noon she was taken to Cheyenne by Dr. Noonan and placed in the private hospital of Dr. Johnson, where everything possible is being done for her. The latest reports yesterday afternoon were that she is resting easier. She slept as well as could be expected Tuesday night.

Dr. Johnson told friends yesterday that no assurance could be given for at least a week, but he felt she had an even chance for recovery. Her body is burned from her body to her limbs, her right arm and hip being burned deeply.

While she is making a brave fight for her life, her hundreds of friends in Kimball are eagerly waiting the latest news from the hospital in Cheyenne.

The Bushnell Record (Bushnell, NE) Thursday, July 20th, 1920


A well to do man in this vicinity went into a drugstore here in town and inquired the price of sulphur. “Ten cents per pound” said Doc Arrowsmith, the manager of the store. “Isn’t that pretty high?” asked the customer, “why, I can get it at Montgomery Ward for seven cents.” “You can get it in Hell for nothing,” answered Doc, “and you won’t have to pay any freight, either.”

The Western Nebraska Observer (Kimball, NE) Thursday, May 16th, 1907


1917

A TRIO OF ACCIDENTS

Clarence D. Dugan, while working at the Farmers Elevator, had his right hand cut badly on Wednesday when an elevator chain caught it and cut through the palm before it was released.

Sam Church of this city is suffering from an injured member. Two fingers of his left hand were crushed and the hand otherwise bruised when a heavy bar fell upon it. His physician hopes to make it as good as new without any loss of usefulness.

Harold Thomas, young son of H. P. Thomas a short distance south of town, was the victim of a compound fracture above the wrist of the right arm on last Monday. The bones protruded and the hand almost laid back on the wrist. Harold and another boy were said to be running, and Harold fell down with that result. The accident happened at the south edge of Sidney.

The Telegraph (Sidney, NE) Friday, October 6th, 1922


Is It Murder Or Accident.

Henry Rasor, living in the extreme northeast part of Antelope county, was accidentally shot the other day and the coroner was summoned from Neligh. In response to a message of inquiry, the station agent at Orchard replied that there had been a scuffle between Mr. Rasor and Mr. Dayton, during which the former, who had a gun in his possession, was shot. From other sources it is learned that there has been previous trouble between the parties.

The Western News-Democrat (Valentine, NE) Thursday, September 1st, 1898


A case against an alleged narcotic peddler arrested by the authorities here collapsed Thursday, when analysis of the supposed cocaine purchased from the defendant by a federal “stool-pigeon” for $20 was merely talcum powder, and of a poor grade at that. The identity of the supposed violator of the Harrison act has not been revealed.

The Torrington Telegram (Torrington, WY) Thursday, July 20th, 1922

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