WEEK 38 2021


Monday night, December 1st, E. W. Lozier, the clerk of the Railroad hotel, was found in the hotel with his hands and legs tied and his mouth stopped with a gag. The hotel was robbed of $200 and Lozier claimed that three disguised men had committed the robbery. Tuesday morning a suspected man was arrested and brought before Lozier for identification, when he positively asserted that the man was one of the trio of robbers. The man clearly proved where he passed the entire night. Suspicion was aroused that Lozier himself was a party to the robbery, and when carefully questioned he told a contradictory and somewhat improbable story. At 10 o’clock Tuesday evening a warrant was issued for Lozier’s arrest. Shortly after the warrant had been issued Lozier went to his room and a few moments afterwards one of the attaches of the hotel rapped on the door of the room when instantly a shot echoed through the house. When the people rushed into the room, Lozier was found lying on the floor with a bullet hole through his left breast. He expired in about two hours.

Plaindealer-Telegraph (Sidney, NE) Saturday, December 6th, 1884


George Krauss, a former resident of Lyman, but making his home at Riverton, Wyo., for several months was killed on February 21st, when a 12-guage shotgun he was unloading from a car was accidentally discharged, the charge striking him square in the face, death being instantaneous. The deceased was employed by the reclamation service and at the time of his death was working on the Wind River project. He is survived by his wife and small daughter, father and mother, and several brothers and sisters. The body was shipped to Torrington where funeral services were conducted under the auspices of the American Legion post of that city, he having served his country during the world war. The remains were laid to rest in the Torrington cemetery.

The Potter Review (Potter, NE) Friday, March 14th, 1930


1923

A straw stack belonging to Frank Ruth, near Shelby, burned last week. He was scattering the remaining straw the next morning so that it would all burn and not hinder plowing, when he discovered the charred remains of his son, 20 years old. The boy had been angry, gone into a grove, wrapped himself in a blanket and read a novel. It is supposed that he then went to the stack and set it on fire. He climbed to the summit and shot himself in the temple with a revolver. When found, he was lying near the center of the smoldering heap, face downward, with his arms burned off to the shoulder sockets and his legs to the abdomen. A hole was in his head. Near him lay the revolver. Only one of the caps had the impression of the revolver, while the others had been fired by the heat.

The Sidney Telegraph (Sidney, NE) Saturday, April 8th, 1899


On Halloween night Orion Walston and Earl Easter had a narrow escape from serious injury. Both boys were horseback going in opposite directions at a pretty swift pace. The flash of an automobile light blinded them and the horses crashed into each other, throwing the boys violently to the ground, the steeds also going down with a crash. The Easter horse was very badly cut and lamed up.

The Burns Herald (Burns, WY) Thursday, November 7th, 1918


Frank Springman, a lad in the Big Piney section, had a very narrow escape when lightning killed the team he was driving and a horse which he was leading at the back of the wagon.

Wyoming Stockman-Farmer (Cheyenne, WY) Monday, November 1st, 1915


Miss Grace Hooser met with a peculiar and painful accident Sunday, when she fell, running a crochet needle into the left limb below the knee. The needle was removed and Miss Hooser is around again.

The Torrington Telegram (Torrington, WY) Thursday, February 19th, 1920