WEEK 20 2021


Horse Beat Dentist Out of a Good Job

Grover, Colo., Aug 26—Suffering from severe toothache, Samuel Rice started to ride twenty-five miles to a dentist today, when his horse threw him and kicked him in the mouth, knocking out the aching tooth.

Wyoming Tribune (Cheyenne, WY) 26 Aug 1912


George Saffell was not suffering from the gout at all; the hose cart ran over his foot the other day when the fire department was called out on what turned out luckily to be a false alarm, but he expects to be in the foot races this week.

The Jireh Record (Jireh, WY) 27 Sep 1913


Cure for Small Pox

Now that the small pox scare is abroad in the land, the following from a physician who is willing to stake his reputation, wealth, and good name if the worst case of small pox cannot be cured in three days simply by the use of cream of tartar. This is the sure and never failing remedy:

“One ounce of cream of tartar dissolved in a pint of boiling water, to be drank when cold at short intervals. It can be taken at any time, and is a preventive as well as a curative.”

It is known to have cured in thousands of cases without failure. It never leaves a mark, never causes blindness, and always prevents tedious lingering.

Plaindealer Telegraph (Sidney, NE) 21 Jan 1882



Details of a tragedy which happened near Lomax, Custer County, have reached Broken Bow, wherein Della, the 3-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Brandt, was shot and instantly killed by Jacob, the 11-year-old son of D. C. Reynolds. The shooting was accidental, the children being allowed to play with firearms.

Alliance Herald (Alliance, NE) 10 Jul 1903


Emil Wills, rancher, living thirty-five miles north of Lusk, was found dead, his mutilated body hanging from the saddle of a cowpony on which he had started to vote in the recent primary.

Goshen County Journal (Torrington, WY) 7 Sep 1922


A Mexican in Scottsbluff beat his wife, and when the sheriff arrived the Mex was found with a six-shooter in his hand and a shotgun nearby. He was taken to Scottsbluff and in less than two hours was sentenced to three years in the pen by District Judge Barron. The Star-Herald says that a mistaken idea of location caused the Mex all the trouble. He supposed he was south of the Rio Grande where they get away with wife beating. The same week a Mexican at Julesburg, Jose Trobar, was fined $10 for beating his wife. Trobar a few days before had paid of $100 for violating the prohibition law. Violating the prohibition law in Scottsbluff varies from $10 up, according to the seriousness of the offense. If you want to beat up your wife, go to Julesburg –it’s cheaper, but if you intend to puncture Volstead’s eighteenth commandment try Scottsbluff first.

Western Nebraska Observer (Kimball, NE) 11 Sep 1924